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Connecting to Improve Lives

Connections of Cumberland County operates the only walk-in Day Resource Center with case management that serves women and children who are homeless or at-risk of homelessness. This center collaborates with other resources to bring a variety of services together in one easy-to-access location.

News & Announcements

  • Honoring Eaton Corporation

    Honoring Eaton Corporation

    In recognition of Eaton Corporation’s valued support, commitment and strong partnership with Connections of Cumberland County, the Board of Directors of Connections has named its Conference Room in Eaton’s honor. The Eaton Corporation Fayetteville Plant has assisted Connections, since inception, in their mission to empower women and children who are homeless or at risk of homelessness to become safe and self-sufficient. Connections operates the only walk-in Day Resource Center with comprehensive case management for women and children who are homeless or facing homelessness.  Pictured left to right: Vivian Tookes, CCC Board Member; Lucy Jones, CCC Board Vice President; Mark Lynch, CCC Board Member; Jerome Bell, CCC Board Member; Jeff Whitford, Human Resource Manager, Eaton Corporation; Rony Ruiz, Plant Manager, Eaton Corporation; Marshall Waren CCC Board Member; and Judy Klinck, CCC Board Member."  Read More »
  • Connections Now Open on Mondays

    Connections Now Open on Mondays

    Connections of Cumberland County is now open an additional day each week, on Mondays.  The operation days are Monday through Thursday, 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.   The new client intake days and hours are Tuesdays and Thursdays, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.Read More »
  • Making the Homeless Whole Again

    Making the Homeless Whole Again

    Check out a recent editorial on Connections work with homeless women and children. "One of the keys to success is accountability. Case managers carefully screen the homeless clients and see that they get help with problems that may have contributed to their homelessness. They find housing and work opportunities, as well as training. They track them for as long as two years. The effort is helped along by interns working toward a master's degree in social work, as well as by volunteers in the mental-health profession. It's a big, complex business model. And it's working." Tim White, Fayetteville Observer Editorial Page Editor Tim White: We can bring them in from the coldRead More »